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Autism and sensing the unlost instinct by Donna Williams

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Published by Jessica Kingsley Publishers in London, Philadelphia .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementDonna Williams.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMLCM 99/02785 (R)
The Physical Object
Pagination131 p. ;
Number of Pages131
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL460713M
ISBN 101853026123
LC Control Number98179038

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Autism: The Movement Sensing Perspective is the result of a collaborative effort by parents, therapists, clinicians, and researchers from all disciplines in science including physics, engineering, and applied mathematics. This book poses questions regarding the current conceptualization and approach. This book illustrates why we should consider autism a neurological difference. Torres offers research and interpretations of movement sensing research as it pertains to autism. This book is comprehensive and academic, yet, contains conclusions at the end of each chapter which make sense to anyone who finds research jargon challenging.5/5(1). Buy a cheap copy of Autism and Sensing: The Unlost Instinct book by Donna Williams. Expanding on themes of her previous book, Autism: An Inside-Out Approach, Donna Williams explains how the senses of a person with autism work, suggesting that 5/5(5). Expanding on themes of her previous book, Autism: An Inside-Out Approach, Donna Williams explains how the senses of a person with autism work, suggesting that they are 'stuck' at an early development stage common to everyone. She calls this the system of sensing, claiming that most people move on to the system of interpretation which enables 5/5(5).

Published in , this highly controversial and challenging book was the first internationally published text book by a person diagnosed with autism on the importance of understanding apperception and the system of sensing in autistic n:   Autism: The Movement Sensing Perspective is the result of a collaborative effort by parents, therapists, clinicians, and researchers from all disciplines in science including physics, engineering, and applied mathematics. This book poses questions regarding the current conceptualization and approach to the study of autism, providing an Cited by: 3.   (For High Definition version add this: &fmt=18 to the end of the URL) Sensing is the preconscious world before interpretive thinking and conscious awareness. It's a cognitive realm most babies. Get this from a library! Autism: the movement sensing perspective. [Elizabeth B Torres; Caroline Whyatt;] -- Series of articles by parents and professionals about the joys and challenges faced by families living with autism.

2) On the other hand, the ‘non verbal’ realm, which you speak of in your book, Autism and Sensing, is a mode of information communicated by feeling, intuition, sensation a place of art, ‘knowing without asking or learning’ (as with savants). Here the more typical individual has difficulty understanding. COVID Resources. Reliable information about the coronavirus (COVID) is available from the World Health Organization (current situation, international travel).Numerous and frequently-updated resource results are available from this ’s WebJunction has pulled together information and resources to assist library staff as they consider how to handle . Expanding on themes of her previous book, Autism: An Inside-Out Approach, Donna Williams explains how the senses of a person with autism work, suggesting that they are 'stuck' at an early development stage common to everyone. She calls this the system of sensing, claiming that most people move on to the system of interpretation which enables them to make sense of the world. She calls this the system of sensing, claiming that most people move on to the system of interpretation which enables them to make sense of the world. In doing so, as well as gaining the means of coping with the world, they lose various abilities which people with autism retain.